From woodworkingnetwork.com: “Fox Valley Technical College Approved as NKBA Accredited Provider“– The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) recently announced that Fox Valley Technical College has met all requirements to become an NKBA Accredited Program provider of AAS Interior Design – Kitchen and Bath Design, and Kitchen and Bath Certificate.

NKBA Accreditation serves the professional needs of the industry and ensures consistent, quality education for students who want to become kitchen or bathroom design professionals. The NKBA currently recognizes over 40 schools in North America whose kitchen and bath curriculum meet the educational standards established by the association.

These established standards include the knowledge and skills necessary for competent practice in the profession, divided into four categories: Planning and Design, Construction/Mechanical Systems, Business Management, and Products/Materials. Each school seeking accreditation must adequately meet stringent NKBA standards in each of these areas.

These schools submit a self-study and an analysis of competencies as related to these areas of study. An onsite evaluation is conducted, consisting of classroom observations; a curriculum-review meeting with faculty; a presentation of projects; and interviews with students, faculty and administration. The educational institution must have accreditation recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or a provincial ministry of education in Canada.

NKBA Accredited Programs are evaluated with respect to mission, administration, curriculum, faculty, and resources to determine eligibility and the students’ aptitude toward fulfilling the Association’s required competencies. Industry professionals evaluate student work samples as a subjective measure of the program. Programs that meet the qualifications for accreditation or a preliminary status of supported are published in print and on the NKBA website.

Each year, the Association monitors the progress of these schools with the submission of student work samples, based on the NKBA Student Design Competition. This process provides an outcome-based assessment to the schools. Accredited Programs have a reevaluation period of seven years.

Fox Valley Technical College earned NKBA Accreditation by demonstrating that it meets these requirements, which represent the basis of a program the NKBA considers essential for quality education. Each student must complete classroom work as well as internships that enhance and extend the classroom experiences. These internships are monitored by the educational institution, which makes certain that they meet the NKBA’s required student competencies. Programs accredited by the National Kitchen & Bath Association must have an NKBA Certified advisor or faculty member.

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From acfchefs.org: “Milwaukee Area Technical College receives programmatic accreditations from the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation” —  Two culinary programs at Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee, received programmatic accreditation by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation (ACFEF) Accrediting Commission in July.

ACFEF programmatic accreditation was granted to Milwaukee Area Technical College for its AAS degree in baking and pastry, and its AAS degree in culinary arts, initially accredited in 1987, was renewed. The accreditations will expire June 30, 2014, and June 30, 2016, respectively.

“The Accrediting Commission evaluates faculty, curriculum, facilities, student services and administrative capability to ensure that the programs promote successful student outcomes,” said Rob Hudson, CEC, CCE, AAC, ACFEF Accrediting Commission chair. “We are proud to recognize Milwaukee Area Technical College’s programs as ACFEF accredited.”

ACFEF programmatic accreditation assures that a program is meeting at least a minimum amount of standards and competencies set for faculty, curriculum and student services. Accreditation ensures that the program follows established standards, has accountability and credibility standards, and maintains a high level of professionalism and up-to-date practices.

Accreditation by the ACFEF Accrediting Commission of a program at an institution is voluntary. To receive accreditation, a program must first submit a self-study. Then, a three-member team performs an on-site evaluation to validate the information submitted in the self-study, which is compiled into a team report. Next, the Accrediting Commission reviews the report, along with the institution’s self-study, and decides if accreditation will be granted and for how long. An initial grant is for three or five years, while a renewal grant is for three, five or seven years. There are currently 392 postsecondary accredited programs and 144 secondary certified programs in 351 institutions accredited by the ACFEF Accrediting Commission worldwide. The ACFEF Accrediting Commission, recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation since 1998, will celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2012.

From sheboyganpress.com: “Ten questions everyone should ask when choosing a college” — By Mike Lanser, president Lakeshore Technical College – Choosing a college has always been an important decision and there are more options than ever before. Working adults may be adding a multitude of online learning choices to their consideration list, while high school seniors and their parents might be thinking about campus safety and student life.

These are important considerations, but I’d like to offer you a list of 10 questions to ask when choosing your college. The answers to these questions not only affect where you start college, but where you will end — which for most people is a successful and rewarding career.

1. Is the college accredited?

Accreditation ensures that the institution adheres to rigorous standards of quality, process improvement and excellence which must be evidenced through documentation and on-site visits by the accrediting body. Lakeshore Technical College is accredited through the Higher Learning Commission, which is one of six regional institutional accreditors in the United States. To find out if the college you’re considering is accredited, visit ncahlc.org.

2. Is the education or credential you’re pursuing valued by potential employers? Ask for job placement rates.

You want to be sure your hard work and investment in college pays off. One indication that employers value the education you’re paying for is to find out about graduates’ job placement. LTC conducts a job placement survey of graduates each year. Last year, 4 out of 5 LTC grads were hired in 6 months or less following graduation.

3. What are the pass rates for students taking certification exams?

Many career-targeted programs promise that they will prepare you for licensure exams. Be sure to ask for pass rates from students who have taken the program previously. It can be good indicator of the program’s quality of instruction. At LTC, our students exceed the national average pass rates for certification exams by 15%.

4. What are the qualifications of the faculty, or better yet, can you meet them?

The quality of your learning experience is in your instructors’ hands. Do they have real-world experience in the area that they’re teaching. Are they certified instructors? Meeting your instructors is also a great way to enhance your understanding about the degree program you’re pursuing as well as your ultimate career goal. LTC instructors have worked in the fields they’re teaching and they welcome the opportunity to talk with students considering our college.

5. Is the program you’re considering offering college credit?

Many colleges offer both credit and non-credit offerings. Be sure to note whether you will earn college credit or not and whether your completion or credential earned will be recognized by potential employers.

6. What is the cost per credit?

Credits are a great way to compare apples to apples. If you’re paying $50 more for every credit, your college expense can really add up. Worse, if you’re not earning credit for the education you’re receiving you’ll want to consider how that could affect your future employment or education plans.

7. What kind of support will the college offer to help you succeed in meeting your educational and career goals?

You might have had areas in high school which challenged you, or maybe you’ve been out of school for a long time. Neither should be reasons for not pursuing your college degree, particularly if your college has services to help you be successful. LTC offers a wide range of free student success services ranging from peer tutors and support groups to academic counseling and career placement services.

8. Will you have the ability to build on your education to help you advance in your career?

Learning is life-long and many employers recognize this through employee tuition reimbursement programs. Keep this possibility in mind when you select a college because you may decide to continue your education after being on-the-job for a number of years. LTC has agreements with over 30 colleges and universities, including Silver Lake, Lakeland, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Green Bay so our graduates can continue to grow in their careers.

9. Is the college providing good value for your investment?

In addition to cost per credit comparisons, take a look at other expenses related to your education. Room & board if you’ll live on-campus, how many years it will take to complete your program, and the availability of financial aid and scholarships.

10. How long has the college been in operation?

You want your college degree, diploma or certificate to lead to job. While not a guarantee for your personal success, you can be assured a college has the commitment and resources to help you succeed when they have a proven history of doing so. LTC is proud to be celebrating a century of educating students for high-demand, local careers.

By answering these ten questions you’ll be armed with good information about the colleges you’re considering and ultimately which one will be the best fit for you to achieve your education and career goals.

BTC to undergo evaluation

January 17, 2012

From beloitdailynews.com: “BTC to undergo evaluation” — Blackhawk Technical College will undergo a comprehensive evaluation visit April 25-27 by a team representing The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Institutional accreditation evaluates an entire institution and accredits it as a whole. Other agencies provide accreditation for specific programs. Accreditation is voluntary.

For the past year and half, Blackhawk Technical College has been engaged in a process of self-study, addressing the Commission’s requirements and criteria for accreditation. The evaluation team will visit the institution to gather evidence that the self-study is thorough and accurate.

The public is invited to submit comments regarding the college to: Public Comment on Blackhawk Technical College, c/o The Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago IL 60604.

Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Written, signed comments must be received by April 3. Comments should include the name, address, and telephone number of the person providing the comments. Comments will not be treated as confidential.

From gazettextra.com: “BTC seeks input on reaccreditation” — Blackhawk Technical College is asking for public input as a part of its reaccreditation process.

A team from the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools will make an evaluation visit April 25-27. The commission has accredited BTC since 1967.

Blackhawk has been engaged in a process of self-study, addressing the commission’s requirements and criteria for accreditation, for the past 18 months. The evaluation team will gather evidence that the self-study is thorough and accurate, according to a news release.

Members of the public may submit comments to: Public Comment on Blackhawk Technical College, c/o The Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago IL 60604.

Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Written, signed comments must be received by April 3. Comments should include the name, address, and telephone number of the person providing the comments. Comments will not be treated as confidential.

From matc.edu: “MATC’s Early Childhood Education Associate Degree Program Receives National Accreditation” — MILWAUKEE – Milwaukee Area Technical College’s Early Childhood Education associate degree program has received accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Commission on Early Childhood Associate Degree Accreditation.

Twelve programs at eight colleges recently earned the accreditation and now, 136 programs have been accredited since the accreditation system was launched in 2006. Approximately 10 percent of the eligible associate degree programs in the country have been accredited.

“Earning accreditation from the NAEYC is a significant achievement for our Early Childhood Education program faculty and students,” said MATC President Dr. Michael L. Burke. “We are especially proud that MATC is the only Wisconsin institution to receive this designation.”

The accreditation system establishes professional preparation standards to raise the quality of early childhood teacher education, and in turn, raise the quality of early education programs serving young children. Accredited associate degree programs provide access to the profession and a strong foundation for the diverse pool of early childhood teachers that are needed in the field.

 

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