From stevenspointjournal.com: “UWSP, MSTC officials hope transfer agreement increases enrollment” — Officials from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and Mid-State Technical College say they hope a recent statewide transfer agreement will mean an increase in enrollment as students see more opportunity to move from one campus to another.

Signed by University of Wisconsin System President Ray Cross and Wisconsin Technical College System President Morna Foy earlier this month, the Universal Transfer Agreement identifies 48 core general-education courses for which students can transfer credits within the two systems. The agreement goes into effect July 1 for the 2014-15 academic year, can be renewed annually and is open to private and tribal institutions that choose to participate.

“Building on the hundreds of existing articulation agreements between the UW System and the WCTS, along with the innovative Transfer Information System, this agreement is another step in our joint efforts to make post-secondary education accessible for more students, facilitating their progress to becoming successful contributors to the Wisconsin economy,” Cross said in a statement.

Gov. Scott Walker, who proposed the agreement as part of the state’s biennial budget adopted last summer, said in a statement that he believes the agreement will allow students more flexibility and speed up the process for those looking to finish their degree.

Greg Summers, vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at UWSP, said the agreement will provide an even playing field for students looking to attend a university after completing their studies at a technical college.

“Before, you would have some credits that would be accepted at Stevens Point that might not be accepted at UW-Eau Claire or UW-Superior,” Summers said. “This agreement broadens the access students will have if they decide to pursue their degree.”

Mandy Lang, vice president of student affairs for MSTC, said students most often transfer to a university to pursue degrees in areas such as nursing and business. Lang said it’s too early to tell whether the agreement will increase enrollment, but making it easier to transfer general education credits is good step for students wherever they choose to attend school.

Nearly 90 students from MSTC and Northcentral Technical College in Wausau transferred into UWSP in the 2012-13 school year, and Summers said he expects that number to increase because of the agreement.

“That would be the goal. I think as students see there is a predictable pathway to get their degree, there will be more interest,” Summers said.

From journaltimes.com: “‘Victory’ over blindness–Woman graduates from Gateway despite going blind while in school” — By Aaron Knapp – RACINE COUNTY — When Leticia Gomez walked up to receive her diploma from Gateway Technical College Tuesday evening, she did so without something that she started her studies with three years ago — her sight.

The 35-year-old Union Grove resident was diagnosed with a degenerative retinal disease in 2010, and even though doctors expected she had 15 years of eyesight remaining, she describes her vision currently as what one might see looking through a hole in a child-sized shoebox.

Nevertheless, Gomez is graduating with an associate of applied science degree in information technology from Gateway with a 3.95 GPA, and will continue her studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the fall.

“Over the past three years, it’s been all about adapting,” she said in a phone interview Monday. “It’s not critical; it’s not taking years off of my life.”

She is one of more than 700 Gateway students expected to graduate either in spring or summer who were recognized at a commencement ceremony at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside’s Sports and Activity Center, 900 Wood Road in Somers, on Tuesday night, according to a press release from Gateway.

Gomez had intended to start school in 2008 and had registered for classes at Cardinal Stritch University, but when her then 4-year-old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, she canceled those plans to be her daughter’s caregiver.

She explained that her daughter requires constant monitoring because she was diagnosed at such a young age that she does not recognize the signs in her body to treat herself.

Although Gomez was diagnosed with a degenerative eye disease two years later, doctors anticipated the disease would take 15 years before she would notice a loss in her vision — ample time to plan for her own livelihood and her daughter to become self-sufficient in treating herself.

That changed as her eyesight failed much more quickly than anticipated. She lost her driver’s license in June 2012 and was deemed legally blind in July 2012, barely two years after the initial diagnosis.

Gomez explained that school became even more urgent to set an example for her daughter, noting that diabetes can lead to blindness.

“I just said, ‘I need to do this for my daughter,’ ” she explained. “Why don’t I choose to be a role model for her?”

Gomez started classes at Gateway’s Racine campus soon after losing her driver’s license, in spite of snickers from passers-by when she was dropped off at school in a bus.

“All the time she’s been in school, she’s worked around it, didn’t bring attention to it,” said instructor Jill Fall. “I’m just thrilled she’s going back to school … nothing stops her.”

Gomez gained confidence as she consistently earned high grades and joined organizations at school, like as an officer in the Association of Information Technology Professionals.

“Seeing those A’s and making the dean’s list … that’s what fueled me to do better because that was the only thing I could control,” she said. “I earned those; I made those happen. I could put in the hard work and see the results. That was my victory.”

Already registered at UW-M, Gomez will start classes toward a four-year degree in information technology in the fall with the end goal of getting her master’s degree and returning to Gateway as an instructor.

From uwsp.edu: “Nicolet College, UW-Stevens Point partner for education program” — A new program at Nicolet College, Rhinelander, will provide a smooth transition for students interested in completing a bachelor’s degree in elementary education at UW-Stevens Point. It begins in June 2014. 

The associate of science elementary education emphasis program will allow Nicolet College graduates to transition into the School of Education at UW-Stevens Point. 

Nicolet students who transfer to UW-Stevens Point after completing an associate degree will have satisfied all UW-Stevens Point general education program requirements plus 48 required credits toward a bachelor of science in elementary education. They will be on schedule to graduate with students who started their elementary education major at UW-Stevens Point. 

“We’re committed to providing our students seamless pathways to earning a bachelor’s degree that ultimately lead to multiple career options,” said Teresa Rose, Nicolet College transfer coordinator. “This collaboration is a perfect example.” 

“Both partners value the collaboration and thrive on enabling our students to be successful future educators,” said Patty Caro, head of UW-Stevens Point’s School of Education. 

Nicolet students will now be able to transfer to UW-Stevens Point and pursue a bachelor’s degree to teach middle childhood through early adolescence level, ages 6-13. A program for students to teach early childhood level, ages 0-8, regular education and early childhood special education has been in place between Nicolet and UW-Stevens Point since 2006. 

For more information, visit nicoletcollege.edu or call the Nicolet College Welcome Center at (715) 365-4493, or visit the UW-Stevens Point School of Education at www.uwsp.edu.

From weau.com: “Survey finds more applicants lying on resumes” — Have you ever lied on a job application?

According to a recent survey by careerbuilder.com 18% of people say they’ve done it and 38% say they’ve stretched the truth on their job responsibilities.

Local hiring managers want to remind people that honesty is always the best policy when it comes to trying to get a new job, and they say technology is making it easier to make sure a resume is telling the truth.

“I have two weeks left and I’ll graduate from CVTC,” Luke Monson said.

Monson had his resume in hand as he talked with employers at the Chippewa Valley Employment Expo Thursday afternoon. Monson says he is ready to launch his career in information technology, landing that job though is a lot easier said than done.

“I think if you don’t stand out you’ll just be tossed to the side,” Monson added.

Kelly Services in Eau Claire says when it comes to hiring, businesses are expecting more from job applicants.

“It’s rare to find a position in manufacturing or other opportunities where you don’t need to use a computer to do your job,” Katie Reid with Kelly Services said.

The high expectations coupled with a more competitive job market are just one of the reasons why carreerbuilder.com says more applicants are turning to lies on resumes. The Eau Claire Job Center says these days employers have a number of tools they can use to make sure what they see on a resume is what they get in an employee.

“Employers are doing more background checks. They are looking on CCAP and they are doing a background check and looking at Facebook and social media,” Eau Claire Job Center employment and training specialist Amber Hoffman said.

The Job Center in Eau Claire says lying on a resume can get you fired. In the long run, Kelly Services says misrepresenting your skills on an application won’t end up benefitting you or your prospective employer.

“You want to be honest and you also want to find the best fit for you and if an employer isn’t aware of everything you have to offer,” Reid said.

The Eau Claire Job Center does offer regular workshops for resume writing at its office. You can also get one on one help on resume writing with an employment specialist at the Job Center during regular business hours.

From antigodailyjournal.com: “Antigo area residents getting a jump on four-year education at NTC here” — Antigo area residents are getting a jump on a four-year college degree—and saving some big cash in the process—at Northcentral Technical College.

Next fall, three students from Antigo will become the first to take advantage of an agreement between NTC and Michigan Technological University that will not only help them earn their bachelor’s degrees in two years, but will save them more than $100,000 each in the process.

Ted Wierzba is one of the students transferring to Michigan Tech in the fall to receive his bachelor of science in electrical engineering. He says with the reputation of the engineering program at Michigan Tech he saw no reason to look anywhere else, plus he says, “The cost savings is crazy!”

Wierzba, Chris Lord and Loryn Becker are all transferring their electromechanical technology associate degree from NTC into the electrical engineering program at Michigan Tech as juniors.

Antigo campus dean Larry Kind said that NTC’s one-year industrial electrical maintenance program serves as the first year of the associate degree electromechanical program.

An additional agreement offers eligible NTC students scholarships that equals the difference between non-resident and resident tuition, saving them $100,280 by starting locally.

“The best part is being able to further my education without taking any steps back from what I’ve already done at NTC,” Lord said. “I didn’t think it would be this easy.”

All three men say with the help of NTC’s Transfer & Placement Office this has been a very simple step for them.

“They walked us through the whole thing. It was so easy,” Becker, who hopes to specialize in robotics and someday work for NASA, said. “It flowed perfectly.”

According to Jeffrey Chamberlin, who instructs the industrial maintenance classes at NTC in Antigo, the one-year program in Antigo allows students to gauge their interest in the career.

“It’s a nice step process,” Chamberlin said. “They can see how they like it, plus they can do it right here at home.”

Greg Neuman, who is currently enrolled in the one-year program in Antigo, said he is considering more training.

“I’ve thought about it,” he said. “I’m not quite that far along yet.”

Brandon Ingram, also enrolled at Antigo, agreed that studying here is a big money-saver.

The electromechanical technology associate degree program is just one of four programs with transfer agreements to Michigan Tech. NTC’s architectural design and technology associate degree transfers into the bachelor of science in construction management at Michigan Tech while the IT – network specialist associate degree transfers into the bachelor of science in computer network and system administration program.

Finally, NTC’s mechanical design engineering technology associate degree transfers to the bachelor of science in mechanical engineering technology at Michigan Tech.

NTC has a series of articulation agreements with public and private universities, allowing students to complete much of their education locally, at a far lower cost.

Examples include accounting, applied engineering, business management, criminal justice, human services, machine tool, marketing, nursing, sustainable architecture and woods.

Agreements are in place across the University of Wisconsin system as well as schools such as Minnesota State, Northland College, Viterbo University and others.

From waow.com: “New opportunity for NTC agriculture students” — Northcentral Technical College and UW-Platteville are teaming up for a new option for agriculture students.

“Students graduating from NTC’s Agri-Business program may transfer into the Bachelor of Science in Agri-Business program; the Dairy Science Associate Degree will transfer into the Bachelor of Science in Dairy Science; and the Veterinary Science Associate Degree graduates may enter the Bachelor of Science in Animal Science program,” according to a news release from Northcentral Technical College.

“The College of Business, Industry, Life Science and Agriculture at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville is very excited to expand our articulation with Northcentral Technical College,” says Jodi McDermott, UW-Platteville Assistant Dean for the College of Business, Industry, Life Science and Agriculture. “We are happy to ease the transfer process for more students by expanding the number of courses which are accepted. We look forward to our continuing relationship with NTC and the students.”

For more information: http://www.ntc.edu/transfer

From journaltimes.com: “Community Newsletter: University of Wisconsin – Parkside” — With a little more than two months complete in the fall 2013 academic semester, University of Wisconsin-Parkside Chancellor Debbie Ford has been busy creating and strengthening opportunities for student success and community involvement.

Forward together

In September, Ford and Gateway Technical College President Bryan Albrecht signed seven new transfer 2-plus-2 articulation agreements. Students graduating from Gateway Technical College with degrees in accounting, business management, marketing and supervisory management will have the opportunity to transfer into programs in the UW-Parkside College of Business, Economics, and Computing. Students graduating with a Gateway Technical College degree in graphic communications have the opportunity to transfer into UW-Parkside’s graphic design (art) degree program in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Depending on the degree, Gateway Technical College students will see 54 to 62 of their credits accepted at UW-Parkside. This is considered a true 2-plus-2 agreement, where students transfer into the university with junior standing.

“For decades, Gateway Technical College and the University of Wisconsin-Parkside have worked together to benefit our communities and provide the talent base our businesses and organizations need,” Ford said.

Most Gateway Technical College and UW-Parkside students live and work in southeastern Wisconsin, so the agreement has the ability to greatly impact area students, their families and businesses and organizations in the region.

 

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